Loch Raven

27 06 2009

I went to the Loch Raven Resevoir two days ago with a couple of friends and my Hasselblad came with me. I loaded it up with some Kodak Tmax 400 film and off we went. I developed them myself that night, which I enjoy immensely, and figured out how to scan them on my cheap flatbed scanner.

Hope 06-24
Loch Raven 06-24





Lo-Fi Photo Day

22 06 2009

I found an old Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera when cleaning out my mom’s house, so I loaded it up with some 120 film (with modified spool) and I plan on taking some photos tomorrow with it to test it out. It is supposed to take 620 film, so I had to cut off the edge of the spool for it to fit in the camera.
Brownie
Since I will be out and about anyway, I loaded some of the same film into my Holga 120n camera. I have never used the 6×4.5 mask with it before, I’ve only ever used it for 6×6 negatives.

I have two boxes of photo chemicals being delivered tomorrow, so I will be able to develop the photos tomorrow night with any luck. The past two times the UPS guy got here, he didn’t just leave the packages here, he left a notice instead. I am going to have to write a note to tell him to leave them this time, so I can do the developing tomorrow rather than have to wait.





Fuji FP-100 Negatives

10 06 2009

I have been working with Fuji FP-100c45 negatives lately. I am ecstatic to have found out about this tecnique, since the Polaroid 55 and 665 packs are beyond expensive. I do have a stock of Polaroid 665 in my fridge, but I do not want to use it except for my next book that I put together.

Lamp and Orchid

Process:

1. Take your photo, and overexpose it by 1-1.5 stops. This will make the negative the proper exposure, but overexpose the print. Then, when you pull it from the camera, do not peel it.

2. Tape the photo, negative (black) side up to a piece of glass. Then, brush undiluted bleach onto the black backing, being careful not to let it leak under the photo.

3. Rinse thoroughly with water until all of the black backing has been removed.

4. Peel the photo from the negative.

5. Rinse the negative again until it is clean.

6. Dip into water/photo-flo mixture and then hang to dry.

Once dry, it is like any other negative and can be scanned or printed as such. I used a color negative in the example, but you can also use Fuji FP-100b. This method only works for the 100 speed, and does not work for Fuji FP-3000.





Update

10 06 2009

Well, it’s been awhile since I have posted any sort of updates. I haven’t really been doing much other than taking photos. I haven’t gotten any of them developed though, so I can’t post them. I did send one roll of 35mm slide film out to Fuji last Friday, so I am hoping to have that back by this Friday. I’ve never sent film out to be developed before though, so I don’t know how long it will take to get back to my apartment. I believe the plant is in Kansas, which isn’t that far away, but it certainly isn’t right next door either. I also have three rolls of 120 film that I want to get developed tomorrow. I have two rolls of slide film and one roll of color negative.

Other than the photography, I have been interested in doing photo transfers onto wood and canvas. I found a technique that is supposed to work with toner prints, but I haven’t been able to try it yet since I don’t have access to a printer that uses toner instead of ink. I am going to have to go to the print lab to make prints, but I will probably wait until next week to do it.

Once I find where I packed my scanner, I will post some photos.